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20110706
20110706
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3 (some duplicates have been removed)
day for u.s. troops in afghanistan. three americans were killed and one was wounded when they were attacked by insurgents in the eastern part of the country. their afghan interpreter was also killed. most american families who lose a loved one in a war zone get a letter of condolence from the president of the united states. but there are a few who are denied that honor. among them, families of troops who commit suicide. we first reported this last week and tonight we have learned that the white house is changing its policy. elaine quijano brings us up to date with the father who led the fight to change the rules. >> i had many doubts. many, many doubts but we're very pleased. >> reporter: last week, greg keesling got the call from the white house he'd waited nearly two years to receive. he learned his family's long wait for acknowledgment from the commander-in-chief was almost over. >> o'neil, my oldest son, came down, and we had a hug and it was very emotional, and "dad, it's going to happen." and that was very good moment that this has been worth it. >> reporter: since the suicid
't get the help they needed must change." the group iraq and afghanistan veterans of america, which has been advocating for more mental health programs for veterans, called the president's action long overdue. >> while we think this is a positive first step, i think a lot more needs to be done, that the white house really needs to redouble its resolve to addressing this suicide epidemic head on. >> would not try to seek honor, nor was he being a coward. >> reporter: if anyone can be credited with changing the policy it's greg and janet keesling, they have been fighting for the change since 2009. that's the year their son, 25-year-old army specialist chance keesling, killed himself on his second tour in iraq. they say acknowledgement from the president gives them some comfort. >> he was a good soldier. so i think that's the part that i want to know that the country appreciates, that he fought, he did everything he was asked to do. >> reporter: but there are still military families who will not be receiving condolence letters. the policy change does not include suicide or training acciden
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3 (some duplicates have been removed)